Aquilon (28)

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Hierarchical Path: Seven Years War (Main Page) >> Navies >> British Navy >> Aquilon (28)

Origin and History

The frigate was built at Rotherhithe and launched on May 24 1758.

During the Seven Years' War, the frigate was under the command of:

  • in 1759 to 1762: captain Challoner Ogle

The frigate was sold on November 29 1776.

Service during the War

In 1759, the frigate served in the Downs and North Sea. In the autumn, she was part of the British squadron in the Downs, under commodore sir Piercy Brett. In October, when the French squadron of Thurot slipped out of Dunkerque harbour through a thick fog and made to the northward, Brett's squadron was ordered to Yarmouth to protect the coasts of England.

In January 1761, the frigate was used as a cruiser. She captured the privateer Santa Theresa (10) and carried her into Cork. In February, she carried the French privateer Comte de Grammont (20) into Lisbon. On March 4, while sailing for England, she captured the privateer Zephire (12). In April, she was part of the small squadron (3 frigates) under captain Matthew Buckle sent to observe the harbour of Brest during the British expedition against Belle-Isle. In July, the frigate captured the French privateer Aurore (10). On August 7 westward of Cape Finisterre, she captured the frigate Subtile (15), a frigate of the French East India Company returning from Mauritius.

In 1762, the frigate brought news to Rodney in the West Indies that a French squadron had escaped from Brest when a storm drove commodore Spry's squadron off station. However, the French squadron reached Martinique before the frigate could inform Rodney.

Characteristics

Technical specifications
Guns 28
Gundeck n/a
Quarterdeck n/a
Forecastle none
Crew n/a
Length at gundeck n/a
Width n/a
Depth n/a
Displacement n/a

References

Blasco, Manuel, British 6th Rates, 3 Decks Wiki

Phillips, M., Michael Phillip's Ships of the Old Navy

N.B.: the section Service during the War is partly derived from our articles depicting the various campaigns, battles and sieges.