Baden-Baden Infantry

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Origin and History

On December 5, 1672, Colonel Ferdinand Ludwig von und zu Wopping und Karpfhaimb obtained a decree from the Emperor to raise a foot regiment of 10 companies and one dragoon regiment also of 10 companies. The recruits should be enlisted in the “Reich”. The foot regiment should have 2,040 men. The enlistment caused some problems, Wopping did not receive the necessary money and had to invest his own money. To solve the problem, Wopping tried to raise recruits in Bohemia, but from February 6, 1673, this practice was forbidden.

The new recruits were concentrated in Bohemia, probably near Pilsen (present-day Plzeň/CZ). On May 8, 1673, Colonel Wopping was given orders by the Hofkriegsrat (War Council) to march with his regiment to Inner-Austria. By that time, the regiment had only 998 men. In September, 5 companies (1,117 men) led by Major Johann Friedrich von Büring went to Moravia. In March 1674, the regiment had 1,743 men.

On January 26, 1674, Hermann Margrave of Baden-Baden was appointed proprietor of the regiment. However, he asked the Emperor for the permission to cede the regiment to his cousin Ludwig Wilhelm. At the beginning of March, Colonel Wopping resigned from his charge and Lieutenant-Colonel Count Zinzendorf took command of the regiment. He started to enlist recruits in the Electorate of Passau and Salzburg.

In November 1675, the regiment (still 5 companies only) took part in siege of Wolgast, which was occupied by the Swedes.

After two years, the Emperor finally accepted the Hermann<s proposal and, on July 11, 1676, Ludwig Wilhelm I Margrave of Baden-Baden was appointed as the new proprietor of the regiment. In August of the same year, his regiment took part in the siege of Demmin. Between December 1676 and January 1677, it then garrisoned Sagan in Silesia.

From 1677 to 1682, the regiment took part in the campaigns against Tököly’s uprising in Hungary. In 1679, it participated in the attack of Tolna in Hungary. In 1681, a grenadier company was formed in the regiment. It became the first regiment of the Austrian Army to receive a grenadier company.

In April 1683, during the Great Turkish War, Karl von Lothringen concentrated an army at Kittsee. On May 6,Emperor Leopold I reviewed this army. The present regiment formed part of this army and consisted of 2,000 men in 10 companies. In June, the regiment took part in the siege of Neuhäusel (present-day Nové Zámky/SK). From July to September, the regiment was part of the troops who defended Vienna against the Turks. On October 9, the regiment participated in the storming of Parkány (present-day Štúrovo/SK).

In 1684,the regiment took part in the siege of Ofen; and in 1685, in the Battle of Gran (present-day Esztregom/HU). In 1686, the regiment was at the second siege of Ofen and took part in the expedition in Lower-Hungary. In November, 3 companies garrisoned Kaposvár while the other companies went to Moravia. On August 12, 1687, the regiment fought in the Battle of Mohács (aka Harsány). At the beginning of 1688, the regiment (5 companies) garrisoned Kronstadt (present-day Brasov/RO). Later on, the regiment (still 5 coys totalling only 653 men) joined the corps of the Margrave of Baden, marching by way of Esseg and Požega towards Sissek, where it arrived on August 7. On August 14, the margrave occupied Kostajnica. In 1689, 5 companies campaigned with the main army in Hungary, and 5 companies were attached to Veterani’s Corps operating in Transylvania. On August 30, the main army fought in an engagement near Patacin (present-day Batočina/Serbia) on the Morawa River where one of the battalions of the regiment, along with 1 battalion of Guido Starhemberg Infantry and 300 horse, occupied an outpost. On September 24, it was also present at the battle of Niš but was not involved in any action. A report dated October 1, stated that only 479 men were fit for duty. Throughout 1690, the second part of the regiment remained with Veterani’s Corps in Transylvania, where it defended the “Eisernes Tor” (Portile de Fier, defile on Danube River on the border between Serbia and Romania). In 1691, the regiment fought in the Battle of Slankamen and took part in the siege of Grosswardein. In 1693, it was at the siege of Belgrade. In 1697, it fought in the Battle of Zenta.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, in 1701, the regiment received orders to raise 4 “Auktionskompanien.” In August, it arrived at the Fortress of Alt-Breisach with 1,651 men. Captain Longueval of the regiment convinced Rákoczi to write a letter to Louis XIV which he would personally transmit. But this “friend” handed this letter over to Court Counsellor Wolfgang von Öttingen in Vienna, thus revealing the intentions of the dissatisfied Hungarian aristocrats. As reward, Longueval received a domain in Hungary and became baron and colonel.

In 1702, the regiment served on the Rhine: 3 battalions garrisoned Alt-Breisach, while one battalion and the grenadiers joined the troops concentrating at Rastatt and took part in the siege of Landau and in the Battle of Friedlingen. Two of the battalions stationed at Alt-Breisach were also involved in the latter battle. During the following winter, the entire regiment was in Alt-Breisach. From August 15 to September 7, 1703, the French besieged and captured Alt-Breisach. After the surrender of the fortress, the regiment went to Rheinfelden. In 1704, the regiment took part in the second siege of Landau. In 1708, it was at the siege of Lille. In 1709, it took part in the Battle of Malplaquet; and in 1712, in the Battle of Denain.

During the War of the Polish Succession, in 1734, the regiment fought against the French.

During the War of the Austrian Succession, on April 10, 1741, two battalions of the regiment fought in the Battle of Mollwitz. In February 1745, at a review, the regiment counted 2,040 men. On June 4, it fought at Hohenfriedberg, where it suffered heavy losses. On September 30, in the Battle of Soor, it lost only 4 men wounded and 17 taken prisoners.

As per the Etat nouveau des Troupes de sa Majesté Impériale Royale comme elles se trouvent effectivement l'an 1759 and Etat général des Troupes qui servent sa Majesté Impériale et Royale Apostolique sur pié en 1760, the regiment counted 4 battalions (2 grenadier coys and 16 fusilier coys) for a total of 2,300 men. This was the administrative organisation of the regiment. However, the tactical organisation differed: 2 field fusilier battalions, each of 6 companies; 2 grenadier companies (usually converged with grenadiers from other battalions into an ad hoc unit); and 1 garrison battalion of 4 companies (see Austrian Line Infantry Organisation for more details).

During the Seven Years' War, the chef of the regiment was:

  • from March 19, 1707 till his death on October 22, 1761: Ludwig George Simpert Margrave von Baden-Baden
  • from October 29, 1761 till his death on October 21, 1771: Margrave August Georg Simpert von Baden-Baden

During the Seven Years' War, its successive colonels-commanders were:

  • from February 28, 17?? to January 17, 1757: Christoph Philipp Baron Müffling (Weiss)
  • from January 17, 1757 to December 5, 1757: Franz Ferdinand von Dimpfel
  • from December 15, 1758 to February 26, 1763: Alois Ernst Count Harrach
  • from March 4, 1763 to March 15, 1766: Franz Wenzel Count Kaunitz-Rietberg

Regimental numbers were introduced only in 1769 when this regiment was designated as "I.R. 23".

The regiment was disbanded in 1809, his last proprietor was Ferdinand Elector of Salzburg, since 1805 Elector of Würzburg.

Service during the War

1756

At the end of September 1756, the 2 field battalions (1.832 men) marched from their garrison in Esseg to join the army of Field Marshal Browne. The third battalion (4 coys for a total of 497 men) remained at Peterwardein.

At the end of the year, the 2 field battalions took up quarters in several places in Moravia.

1757

On April 30, 1757, the regiment arrived at the camp at Nembschitz (present-day Němčičky u Brna/CZ) where it was attached to the corps of FML Kolowrat as part of GdC Serbelloni’s Army.

On June 18 1757, two battalions of the regiment took part in the Battle of Kolin where they were deployed on the left of the second line in Plonquet's Brigade. One of the grenadier coy was part of the converged grenadier battalion of Major Count Soro, the other in the converged grenadier battalion of Captain Sander. The regiment lost 106 men killed, 4 officers and 152 men wounded and 173 missing. After the battle the remnants of the regiment were organised in one battalion and one grenadier coy which were allocated to the division of FML Vincenz Count Starhemberg.

On November 22, one battalion of the regiment took part in the Battle of Breslau where it was deployed in Gemmingen's Brigade, in the second line of the infantry centre under Baron Kheul. For their part, the grenadiers were attached to the grenadier corps of FML Sprecher. In this battle, the regiment lost 2 officers and 18 men killed, 8 officers and 117 men wounded and 22 missing. After the battle the regiment was allocated to the brigade of GFWM Plonquet, in FML Maquire’s Division.

On December 5 at the Battle of Leuthen, one battalion of the regiment was deployed in Wied's Brigade in the second line of the infantry left wing under Colloredo. Once more, the regiment suffered heavy losses in this battle. Colonel Franz Ferdinand von Dimpfel, Major Christoph Philipp Baron von Kettenburg and 1 NCO were killed; Lieutenant-Colonel Alois Count Harrach, 3 officers and 51 men wounded; and 2 NCOs and 147 men were taken prisoners. After the battle, the regiment had only 436 men left! In addition, it lost its baggage, wagon and horses during the retreat. The regiment (now 1,383 men effective, including 199 men in Zittau, Görlitz, Liegnitz, Schweidnitz, 729 men wounded or ill, and only 447 men fit for duty) took up its winter-quarters around Königgrätz (present-day Hradec Králové/CZ).

Meanwhile, the garrison battalion (third battalion) remained at Peterwardein until August 31, when it marched by way of Budapest to Brünn (present-day Brno/CZ). From the end of November, it garrisoned Olmütz (present-day Olomouc/CZ). At the end of the year, this battalion counted 500 men.

1758

In 1758, the two field battalions were sent to Bohemia. By January 31, they had 1,360 effective men.

On April 18, when the Fortress of Schweidnitz surrendered, 2 officers and 87 fusiliers of the regiment were taken prisoner.

In May, during the Prussian invasion of Moravia, the regiment was allocated to the troops of FML Anger near Trautenau (present-day Trutnov/CZ). On May 17, the regiment joined FM Daun’s Army in the region of Leitomischl (present-day Litomyšl/CZ). During the Siege of Olmütz, the third battalion, led by Lieutenant-Colonel Johann von Gallahan was allocated to the brigade of GFWM Josip Count Drašković.

On May 24, the field battalion was with the corps of FZM Count Harsch at Allerheiligen (present-day Vyšehorky/CZ). On June 16, these battalions (682 men) joined the main army at Protivanov.

On July 2, the Prussians raised the siege of Olmütz. During this siege, the third battalion had lost 19 men killed, 29 wounded and 1 missing. The field battalions accompanied with the main army when it followed the retiring Prussians.

By August 2, the regiment (still only 1 battalion of 956 men) was part of the reserve of the main Austrian army under the command of Daun near Jarmeritz. Daun was following up the Prussian army retiring through Bohemia.

In September, the regiment was allocated to the troops of FZM Prince Baden-Durlach and marched to Upper Lusatia.

On October 14, at the Battle of Hochkirch, the corps of FZM Prince Baden-Durlach was posted on the Stromberg. Towards the end of the battle, it supported the attack of the Duke von Arenberg.

The regiment (now 1.249 men) took up its winter-quarters at Kamnitz (present-day Česká Kamenice/CZ).

At the end of the year, the third battalion (622 men) was sent to Italy.

1759

At the end of February, 1759, the regiment counted 1,636 men in 2 field battalions and 2 grenadier companies. In March, it was allocated to the main army, and formed part of the corps of FZM Harsch. At the end of April, the regiment went to Nachod (present-day Náchod/CZ). From June, it was allocated to the Corps de Réserve, under GFWM Count Siskovič. On July 27, both field battalions and the grenadiers were allocated to the corps of FML G. von Loudon and went to Rothenburg.

On August 12 1759, the regiment fought in the sanguinary Battle of Kunersdorf. The grenadiers were part of the converged grenadier battalion Campitelli which initially defended the “Kuh-Grund,” soon followed by the two field battalions of the regiment, led by GFWM Elrichshausen. Colonel Harrach was heavily wounded at the very beginning of combats, and Lieutenant-Colonel von Strasser assumed command. Due to dust, the Russian infantry could not identify the allied troops of regiment Baden-Baden and fired on it from behind. OWM von Rolke rode towards the Russians through a hail of bullets and managed to make them cease fire. During this action, Rolke and his horse were wounded several time by bullets. The regiment had the highest losses of Loudon’s Corps: 75 men killed, 23 officers, 6 NCOs and 395 men wounded, and 101 missing (for their conduct on the battlefield, Lieutenant-Colonel Wolfgang Felix Strasser von Neudegg and OWM Karl von Rolke would be admitted in the Maria-Theresia-Order in the fifth promotion of January 23, 1760). After such big losses had the regiment after the battle 1 field battalion and one grenadier company only.

The regiment then marched with Loudon’s Corps to Krakau, where it arrived at the beginning of December. There, Loudon’s troops recovered from this exhausting march. The wounded soldiers were sent to Käsmark (present-day Kežmarok/SK) and Leutschau (present-day Levoča/SK). The regiment later marched to Moravia and took up its winter-quarters at Dobitschau (present-day Tovačov/CZ).

Meanwhile, the third battalion had spent the whole year in Italy.

1760

On January 5, 1760, the regiment went to Jitschin (present-day Jičín/CZ) where FML Campitelli took command of a brigade formed by the present regiment, Deutschmeister Infantry and Starhemberg Infantry. By the end of January had the regiment counted 1,778 men. Campitelli then marched to Reichenberg where he arrived on February 7. There GFWM Weichs took command of these troops.

On April 10, the regiment was allocated to the corps of FML Baron Beck which was posted in the vicinity of Zittau and Ostritz. At the end of April, the regiment joined to the 40,000 men strong corps of FZM Loudon. On May 28, this corps concentrated in a camp at Kosteletz (present-day Kostelec nad Orlicí/CZ). From there FZM Loudon marched to Silesia.

On June 23, the regiment (1,872 men) took part in the Battle of Landeshut. The grenadiers were in the first column of GFWM baron Elrichshausen, while the field battalions in the reserve and were not involved in any action. Only the grenadiers lost 1 captain and 5 men wounded. After this battle, FZM Loudon sent 19 infantry battalions (including the present regiment) and 2 cavalry regiments to reinforce the troops who laid siege to Glatz (present-day Klodsko/PL) which surrender on June 26.

On August 15 1760, the regiment took part in the Battle of Liegnitz. The two field battalions were in the first line in the brigade of GFWM Baron Vogelsang, in the division of FML Baron Müffling. The grenadiers, led by Colonel Count Harrach were in the Corps de Réserve. Only the grenadiers and the Oberstenbataillon (first battalion) saw action in this battle where the regiment lost 2 SCOs and 26 men killed; 74 wounded; and 1 officer and 210 men taken prisoners.

Loudon’s Corps remained till 31 August at Striegau (present-day Strzegom/PL).

The regiment (2,030 men by November 30) took up its winter-quarters between Gostitz (present-day Gościce/PL) and Jauernik (Javorník/CZ).

Once more, the third battalion (677 men by November 16) spent the whole year in Italy in the regions of Milan and Como.

1761

On January 20, 1761, the two field battalions were reviewed at Landeck (present-day Ladek Zdrój/PL), they counted 2,091 men and were allocated to the army of FZM Loudon, in the brigade of GFWM Lacy, in the division of FML Wolfersdorf. The grenadiers, together with those of Moltke Infantry and Los Rios Infantry formed a converged grenadier battalion led by GFWM Marquis Botta.

In July, the two field battalions were sent to support FML Jahnus’s troops in the mountainous region between Trautenau (present-day Trutnov/CZ) and Wartha (Bardo/PL).

At the end of August, the two field battalions were with Jahnus’ Corps at Burkersdorf (present-day Burkatów/PL).

On October 1, during the storming of Schweidnitz, the two field battalions, as part of Jahnus’ Corps, encircled and blockaded the fortress. Only the grenadiers of the regiment, who had been converged in the grenadier battalion of Mitrovsky, fought in the second column which attacked the Jauerniker Fort. Fortunately, the grenadiers did not suffer a single loss.

On October 6, the field battalions were allocated to the corps of FML Josip Count Drašković posted at Zuckmantel (present-day Zlaté Hory/CZ).

On December 4, the regiment (1,983 men) was sent to its winter-quarters around Kunzendorf (present-day Trzebieszowice/PL).

During the entire year, the third battalion (624 men at the end of the year) led by Captain Paul Simon Eich Baron von Dietzweiler remained in the region of Como in Italy.

1762

In April 1762, the regiment joined the division of FML Baron Müffling at Zirlau (present-day Ciernie/PL).

On May 10, when the regiment was reviewed by FZM Count Lacy could field a single battalion with 2 grenadier companies, for a total of only 742 men fit for duty (approx. 650 men were reported ill). The grenadiers of the regiment were converged with those of Haller Infantry and Batthyányi Infantry to form a grenadier battalion under Lieutenant-Colonel O’Brien, in the brigade of GFWM Pellegrini.

Bu June 30, the regiment already counted a total of 1,846 men, but 506 men were still reported as sick.

On July 20, the regiment, along with Baden-Durlach Infantry, was placed in entrenchments near Leutmannsdorf (present-day Lutomia/PL). On July 21, it took part in the Battle of Burkersdorf (present-day Burkatów/PL), where it lost 5 officers and 65 men wounded, and 111 missing.

From July to October, during the siege of Schweidnitz, a detachment of 5 officers and 111 men of the regiment formed part of the converged battalion of Colonel Rasp in the garrison defending the fortress. After surrender of Schweidnitz the detachment became prisoners of war.

From September, the regiment belonged to the brigade of GFWM Callenberg, in the division of FML Baron Unruhe.

On November 30, the regiment took up its winter-quarters around Pilnickau (present-day Pilínkov, part of Vlčice/CZ) and Silberstein (present-day Hrádeček, part of Vlčice/CZ).

The third battalion remained the entire year at Como in Italy.

1763

At the end of January 1763, the regiment counted 1,660 men. On March 18, it was transferred to the region of Bechinie (present-day Bechyně/CZ). On April 10, the regiment was informed of its final destination: Milan, where it arrived on July 8. The third battalion joined the rest of the regiment there.

Uniform

Until recently we had a very vague description of the uniform at the outbreak of the Seven Years' War. Thanks to the kind authorisation of the Heeresgeschichtliches Museum in Vienna, Dal Gavan, a member of our group, has had access to the Delacre Bilderhandschrift, a rare contemporaneous manuscript depicting the uniforms of the entire K. K. Army around 1756-57. For this reason, we present the uniforms of privates circa 1757 and in 1762.

After the Seven Years’ War, in accordance with the new order dated December 9, 1764, the regiment received a new uniform with red (ponceaurot) cuffs and white buttons; the lapels on the coat were eliminated; and the tricorne was replaced by a fusiliers “casquet.”

Privates 1757

Uniform in 1757 - Source: Frédéric Aubert from a template made by Richard Couture.
Uniform in 1757: option showing the most likely colour - Source: Frédéric Aubert
Uniform in 1757
as per the Delacre Bilderhandschrift of 1757, Muhsfeldt and Schirmer

completed with other sources where necessary
Headgear
Musketeer black tricorne laced white; two white stiffening tapes on the right; a white button on the left
Grenadier bearskin with a dark blue bag probably laced white and a white tassel
Neckstock one red and one black (for parades the regimental commanders agreed before on the colour of the neckstocks)
Coat white lined dark blue with 3 white buttons under the right lapel and 1 white button in the small of the back on each side
Collar none
Shoulder Straps none visible
Lapels dark blue with 7 white buttons (arranged 1-3-3 from the top)
Pockets none visible, probably horizontal pockets, each with 3 white buttons
Cuffs dark blue, each with 3 white buttons spaced on top front of cuff
Turnbacks Purple after the Delacre Bilderhandschrift but we think the color had faded. Original color would be dark blue
Waistcoat dark blue with 2 rows of small white buttons and with horizontal pockets, each with 3 white buttons (only 2 visible on the Delacre plate)
Breeches Purple after the Delacre Bilderhandschrift but we think the color had faded. Original color would be dark blue
Gaiters one pair of black (for winter) and one pair of white gaiters (for summer and parade)
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt white
Waistbelt white
Cartridge Box black (front not visible)
Bayonet Scabbard black with brass fittings
Scabbard black (grenadiers only)
Footgear black shoes


Rank and file were armed with a musket (Model 1745 for fusiliers, Model 1754 for grenadiers). Grenadiers carried a sabre while fusiliers carried only a bayonet.

Privates 1762

Uniform in 1762 - Source: Frédéric Aubert from a template made by Richard Couture.
Uniform in 1762
as per the Bautzener Handschrift

completed with other sources where necessary
Headgear
Musketeer black tricorne laced white with a small yellow button on the left side; dark blue within white cockade and white within dark blue pompoms in the lateral cornes
Grenadier bearskin with a dark blue bag probably laced white and a white tassel
Neckstock one red and one black (for parades the regimental commanders agreed before on the colour of the neckstocks)
Coat white lined white with 3 yellow buttons under the right lapel and 1 yellow button in the small of the back on each side
Collar none
Shoulder Straps white bordered dark blue and fastened by a yellow button (left shoulder only)
Lapels dark blue with 7 yellow buttons (1-3-3)
Pockets horizontal pockets, each with 3 yellow buttons
Cuffs dark blue with 3 yellow buttons
Turnbacks white attached with a dark blue fastener
Waistcoat white with 2 rows of small yellow buttons (3-3-3) and with horizontal pockets, each with 3 yellow buttons
Breeches white
Gaiters one pair of black (for winter) and one pair of white gaiters (for summer and parade)
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt white
Waistbelt white with a brass buckle
Cartridge Box black with a small brass plate carrying the initials “MT”
Bayonet Scabbard black with brass fittings
Scabbard black (grenadiers only)
Footgear black shoes


Rank and file were armed with a musket (Model 1745 for fusiliers, Model 1754 for grenadiers). Grenadiers carried a sabre while fusiliers carried only a bayonet.

Other interpretations

Donath illustrates a uniform with light blue distinctive and white buttons.

NCOs

no information found yet

Sergeants carried a halberd and a wooden stick.

Corporals carried a halberd.

Officers

The officers wore the same uniform as the privates with the following exceptions:

  • tricorne laced gold with a white and green cockade
  • black neckstock
  • no turnbacks
  • yellow and black silk sash

Senior officers carried sticks identifying their rank:

  • lieutenant: bamboo stick without knob
  • captain: long rush stick with a bone knob
  • major: long rush stick with a silver knob and a small silver chain
  • lieutenant-colonel: long rush stick with a larger silver knob without chain
  • colonel: long rush stick with a golden knob

Musicians

As per a regulation of 1755, musicians were now distinguished from rank and file only by dark blue swallow nests on the shoulders.

The drum had a brass barrel decorated with black flames at the bottom and with a black double headed Eagle on a yellow field. Rims were decorated with red and white diagonal stripes. The bandolier was white.

Colours

All German infantry regiments carried identical colours: a white Leibfahne (colonel) and yellow Regimentsfahne. The hand painted colours were made of silk and measured Size 178 cm x 127 cm. The 260 cm long flagpoles had golden finial and were decorated with black and yellow spirals of cloth.

The colonel colour was carried by the first battalion.

Colonel flag (Leibfahne):

  • field: white
  • border: alternating white and yellow outer waved triangles pointing inwards, red and black inner waved triangles pointing outwards
  • obverse (right): the Immaculate Mother of God (which had been declared the patroness of the army by kaiser Ferdinand III) on a cloud, crushing a snake under her foot and surrounded by rays
  • reverse (left): crowned and armed Imperial double-eagle with the "Lothringen-Toscanian" arms on a shield and the initials of the Emperor CF (Corregens Franciscus) on the left wing and IM (Imperator Magnus) on the right
Leibfahne – Source: PMPDel

Regimental flags (Regimentsfahne):

  • field: yellow
  • border: alternating white and yellow outer waved triangles pointing inwards, red and black inner waved triangles pointing outwards
  • obverse (right): crowned and armed Imperial double-eagle with the "Lothringen-Toscanian" arms on a shield and the initials of the Emperor CF (Corregens Franciscus) on the left wing and IM (Imperator Magnus) on the right
  • reverse (left): unarmed and crowned Imperial double-eagle with the arms of Hungaria and Bohemia on a shield and the initials M on the left wing and T on the right
Regimentsfahne – Source: PMPDel

In fact, the situation on the field was slightly more complex than this, since colours were usually replaced only when worn out. It is fairly possible that some regiment who had been issued colours of the 1743 pattern were still carrying them at the beginning of the Seven Years' War. For more details, see Austrian Line Infantry Colours.

References

This article contains texts from the following sources, which are now in the public domain:

  • Anon.: Geschichte des K. und K. Infanterieregiments Markgraf von Baden No. 23, Vol. I. 1672-1811, Budapest, 1911
  • Seyfart: Kurzgefaßte Geschichte aller kaiserlich-königlichen Regimenter zu Pferde und zu Fuß, Frankfurth and Leipzig, 1762, p. 6
  • Wrede, C. v.: Geschichte der K.und K Wehrmacht, file II. pp. 232ff

Other sources

Dihm, Dr. Hermann: Oesterreichische Standarten und Fahnen zur Zeit des 7 jährigen Krieges, Die Zinnfigur, Klio

Donath, Rudolf: Die Kaiserliche und Kaiserlich-Königliche Österreichische Armee 1618-1918, 2. Aufl., Simbach/Inn 1979

Etat nouveau des Troupes de sa Majesté Impériale Royale comme elles se trouvent effectivement l'an 1759

Etat général des Troupes qui servent sa Majesté Impériale et Royale Apostolique sur pié en 1760

Funcken, Liliane and Fred: Les uniformes de la guerre en dentelle

Hausmann, Friedrich: Die Feldzeichen der Truppen Maria Theresias, Schriften des Heeresgeschichtlichen Museums, vol. 3, Vienna: 1967

Knötel, Herbert d.J.; Brauer, Hans M.: Heer und Tradition / Heeres-Uniformbogen (so-called “Brauer-Bogen”), Berlin 1926-1962, Österreich-Ungarn – 1756-63

Muhsfeldt, Th.: Abzeichenfarben der K. und K. Regimenter zu Fuss im Jahre 1757 und früher, in Mitteilungen zur Geschichte des militärischen Tracht, No. 12, 1904

Schirmer, Friedrich: Die Heere der kriegführenden Staaten 1756-1763, hrsg. von der KLIO-Landesgruppe Baden-Württemberg, überarb. u. aktual. Neuauflage 1989

Seidel, Paul: Nochmals österreichische Standarten und Fahnen zur Zeit des 7 jährigen Krieges, Die Zinnfigur, Clio

Thümmler, L.-H.: Die Österreichiches Armee im Siebenjährigen Krieg: Die Bautzener Bilderhandschrift aus dem Jahre 1762, Berlin 1993

N.B.: the section Service during the War is mostly derived from our articles depicting the various campaigns, battles and sieges.

Acknowledgments

Harald Skala for the translation and integration of the regimental history of this unit

User:Zahn for gathering initial information about this regiment