Markgraf Friedrich von Bayreuth Dragoons

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Hierarchical Path: Seven Years War (Main Page) >> Armies >> Prussian Army >> Markgraf Friedrich von Bayreuth Dragoons

Origin and History

Markgraf Friedrich von Bayreuth Dragoons Trooper in 1756 - Source: Kling, C., Geschichte der Bekleidung, Bewaffnung und Ausrüstung des Königlich Preussischen Heeres

The regiment was created on April 2 1717 for Achaz von der Schulenburg, with troops contributed by all Prussian cuirassier and dragoon regiments.

During the War of the Austrian Succession, the regiment took part to the invasion of Silesia in January 1741 and fought at Mollwitz and Brieg. On May 17 1742, it took part to the battle of Chotusitz. In 1744, it took part in the capture of Prague. In 1745, it fought at the battles of Hohenfriedberg (June 4), Schatzlar (September 23) and Kesselsdorf (December 14).

Exceptionally, this dragoon regiment counted 10 squadrons rather than the usual 5 squadrons.

During the Seven Years' War, the regiment was under the command of:

  • since August 7 1731 until May 1763: markgraf Friedrich von Bayreuth

In 1763, at the end of the Seven Years' War, the regiment consisted of 1616 Prussians, 50 Saxons and 255 “foreigners”.

Service during the War

On August 26 1756, when the Prussian army proceeded to the invasion of Saxony, the regiment was part of the left column led by the prince of Bevern. This column had concentrated in the area of Lübben, then advanced through Lusatia by Hoyerswerda and Bautzen, to Hohenstein (Sept. 8) then to Lohmen north of the Elbe near Pirna. On October 1, the regiment took part to the battle of Lobositz under lieutenant-general Katte. During this battle, the regiment lost 4 officers, 7 NCOs and 150 privates. In the days after the battle, it was assigned to the protection of the defiles near Welmina.

On May 6 1757, the regiment did not take part to the battle of Prague. It was rather deployed on the left bank of the Moldau near the Weissenberg as part of Keith's corps. On September 7, when an Austrian force under the command of general Nádasdy attacked Winterfeldt's isolated corps at Moys, the regiment was deployed in the first line of the cavalry left wing. On November 22, the regiment took part to the battle of Breslau where it was deployed in Meier's brigade, in the second line of the left wing under lieutenant-general von Zieten. On December 2, after this defeat, it joined Frederick's army at Parchwitz. On December 5 at the battle of Leuthen, the regiment was deployed in Meyer's brigade in the first line of the cavalry left wing under lieutenant-general von Driesen. At about 4:00 PM, when the Austrian right wing cavalry attacked the exposed Prussian left flank, the regiment charged in its left flank while Puttkammer Hussars attacked its rear and Driesen charged frontally. Together, they broke and routed the Austrian cavalry.

In 1758, the regiment took part to the invasion of Moravia. From may to July, it was at the siege of Olmütz. On October 14, it fought at the battle of Hochkirch where it formed part of Retzow's corps near Weissenberg. It was among the first units of Retzow's corps to come to the relief of Frederick's left wing, charging and driving back Austrian cavalry units.

In 1759, it operated between the Bober and the Elbe.

In 1760, the regiment served in Saxony in prince Henry's corps. On February 20, it fought at Kossdorf where it lost 10 officers, 308 privates and a standard. On November 3, it fought with great distinction at the battle of Torgau.

In 1761, the regiment served in Saxony.

To do: more details on the campaigns from 1759 to 1762

Uniform

Privates

Uniform in 1757 - Source: Frédéric Aubert
Uniform in 1757
Headgear black tricorne (no lace) with a black cockade fastened with a small white button and yellow pompons

N.B.: for combat, the tricorne was reinforced with an iron cap

Neckstock black
Coat cobalt blue with 2 white buttons under the lapel and 3 white buttons on each side to fasten the skirts forming the turnbacks
Collar carmine red
Shoulder strap left shoulder: blue fastened with a white button
right shoulder: white with a white aiguillette
Lapels carmine red with 6 white buttons grouped 2 by 2
Pockets horizontal pockets each with 2 white buttons
Cuffs carmine red (Swedish style) with 2 white buttons
Turnbacks carmine red
Waistcoat straw yellow with one row of small white buttons and horizontal pockets, each with white buttons
Breeches buff
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt white
Waistbelt white
Cartridge Box black leather
Scabbard brown leather
Bayonet scabbard brown leather
Footgear black boots
Horse Furniture
Saddlecloth carmine red with pointed corners; bordered with a wide white braid decorated with 3 thin red braids
Housings carmine red pointed housings; bordered with a wide white braid decorated with 3 thin red braids
Blanket roll cobalt blue


Troopers were armed with a sword, a pair of pistols, a musket and a bayonet.

Officers

Markgraf Friedrich von Bayreuth Dragoons Officer Lace - Source: Kling, C., Geschichte der Bekleidung, Bewaffnung und Ausrüstung des Königlich Preussischen Heeres

The officers wore the same uniform with the following exceptions:

  • black tricorne (no lace) with a black cockade (attached with a golden fastener) and black and silver pompons
  • silver buttonholes on the coat


Musicians

Markgraf Friedrich von Bayreuth Dragoons Drummer Uniform - Source: Kling, C., Geschichte der Bekleidung, Bewaffnung und Ausrüstung des Königlich Preussischen Heeres
Markgraf Friedrich von Bayreuth Dragoons Drummer Lace - Source: Kling, C., Geschichte der Bekleidung, Bewaffnung und Ausrüstung des Königlich Preussischen Heeres

Drummers of the regiments probably wore the same uniform as the troopers but decorated on the seams with a white lace with 4 red stripes.

Colours

Standards were made of damask. They were swallow-tailed and measured some 50 cm along the pole, 65 cm from the pole to the extremity of a point and 50 cm from the pole to the centre of the indentation. The cords and knots were of silver threads. The pole of the standard was a black tournament lance reinforced with iron hinges. The golden spearhead wore the crowned monogram of Frédéric Wilhelm (FWR).

The Leibstandarte of the regiment was still of the old “FWR” design. However, the regiment lost three Eskadronstandarten in 1742 and two more in 1760. It thus had a mix of the old “FWR” design cohabiting with standards of the newer “FR” design.

Colonel Standard “FWR” design (Leibstandarte): white field fringed gold; centre device consisting of a black medallion surmounted by a gold crown and surrounded by a golden laurel wreath and decorated with a golden eagle flying towards a golden sun surmounted by a white scroll laced gold bearing the golden motto "Non Soli Cedit"; corner devices (crowns, laurel wreaths and “FWR” ciphers) in gold. Squadron Standards “FWR” design (Eskadronstandarte): black field fringed gold; centre device consisting of a white medallion surmounted by a gold crown and surrounded by a golden laurel wreath and decorated with a black eagle flying towards a golden sun surmounted by a white scroll laced gold bearing the golden motto "Non Soli Cedit"; corner devices (crowns, laurel wreaths and “FWR” ciphers) in gold.
Colonel Standard – Source: Dal Gavan
Squadron Standard – Source: Dal Gavan
  Squadron Standards “FR” design (Eskadronstandarte): black field fringed gold; centre device consisting of a white medallion surmounted by a gold crown and surrounded by a golden laurel wreath and decorated with a black eagle holding a sword and lightning bolts surmounted by a black scroll laced gold bearing the golden motto "Pro Gloria et Patria"; corner devices (crowns, laurel wreaths and “FR” ciphers) in gold
 
Squadron Standard – Source: Dal Gavan

References

Funcken, Liliane and Fred , Les uniformes de la guerre en dentelle

Kling, C., Geschichte der Bekleidung, Bewaffnung und Ausrüstung des Königlich Preussischen Heeres, Weimar, 1906, vol. 2, p. 45

Nelke, R., Preussen

Thümmler, L.-H., Preußische Militärgeschichte

Vial J. L., Nec Pluribus Impar

N.B.: the section Service during the War is mostly derived from our articles depicting the various campaigns, battles and sieges.