Rostaing, Philippe Joseph, Comte de

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Rostaing, Phillipe Joseph, Comte de

French artillery officer (1732-93)

born October 9, 1719, France

died 1793, near Paris, France

Description

Phillipe Joseph comte de Rostaing, was born on October 9 1719.

At the age of 16, Rostaing was admitted at the artillery school of Metz.

In 1732, Rostaing became officer pointer. He then took part in the campaigns of the War of the Polish Succession.

In 1737, Rostaing was promoted special commissioner.

In 1741, Rostaing was sent to India to organize the artillery, establish an artillery school and a powder manufacture. He then served at Ile de France (today Ile Maurice) where he established a saltpetre refinery and a powder mill.

In 1744, Rostaing was made ordinary commissioner. He assumed command of land and naval artillery under the command of La Bourdonnais, directing the artillery during the siege of Madras.

In 1745, Rostaing was received chevalier de Saint Louis en 1745.

In 1749, Rostaing returned to Ile de France where he organised the defence to prevent a British landing.

In 1755, Rostaing returned to France.

In 1758, Rostaing received 1000 livres for the new artillery piece which he had invented (see piece à la Rostaing in French Artillery Equipment).

In 1759, Rostaing obtained a commission of lieutenant-colonel.

On October 15 1765, Rostaing was promoted colonel of “Grenoble Artillerie”.

On January 22 1769, Rostaing was promoted brigadier of the King's armies.

In 1774, Rostaing became director of the artillery school of Grenoble.

In 1779, Rostaing was promoted inspector general of the artillery.

On March 1 1780, Rostaing was promoted maréchal de camp.

On May 20 1791, Rostaing was promoted lieutenant-general.

In 1793, during an inspection in Auxonne, Rostaing was arrested to be taken to the revolutionary tribunal in Paris. On his way to the tribunal, he fell sick and died soon afterward.

References

Acknowledgement

Jean-Louis Vial for the initial version of this article