Stampach Cuirassiers

From Project Seven Years War
Jump to: navigation, search

Hierarchical Path: Seven Years War (Main Page) >> Armies >> Austrian Army >> Stampach Cuirassiers

Origin and History

On 6 February 1682, Colonel Friedrich Count Veterani received a decree authorising him to raise a cuirassier regiment. This new regiment incorporated one company of Caprara Cuirassiers and one company of Montecuccoli Cuirassiers. Enlistment took place in Silesia. Once reviewed, the new regiment marched to Hungary.

In 1684, the regiment took part in the Battle of Eperies (present-day Prešov/SK); in 1685, in the siege of Kaschau, in 1686, in the expedition in Upper-Hungary and in the engagement of Szegedin.

In 1695, the regiment took part in the Battle of Lugos where it greatly distinguished itself; in 1696, in the Battle of Ollasch; and in 1697, in the Battle of Zenta.

From 1699 to 1701, the regiment assumed garrison duty in Transylvania.

During the War of the Spanish Succession (1702–1714), in 1702, the regiment was transferred from Transylvania to the Rhine where it took part in the siege and capture of Landau. In 1703, the regiment was attached to the army of the Margrave of Baden but saw no action. In 1704, the regiment participated in the Battle of Blenheim. From September to November it then took part in the second siege of Landau. From 1705 to 1711, it was attached to the Reichsarmee and did not take part in any noticeable action. In 1712, the regiment was transferred to the Low Countries where it took part in the action of Fampoux and in the Battle of Denain. Afterwards, it served once more with the Reichsarmee but saw no action.

After the war, from 1714 to 1716, the regiment assumed garrison duty in Moravia.

In 1716 and 1717, the regiment campaigned once more in Hungary against the Turks, taking part in the battles of Peterwardein, Temesvár and Belgrad.

From 1717 to 1720, the regiment joined Austrian troops stationed in Sicily.

During the War of the Polish Succession, in 1734 and 1735, the regiment was attached to the army of Prince Eugène de Savoie, operating on the Rhine.

In 1737, the regiment returned to Hungary and Transylvania where it remained until 1741.

During the War of the Austrian Succession, in 1742, the regiment took part in the siege of Prague; and in 1743, in the campaign in Bavaria. It 1744, it retired to Bohemia. In 1745, it campaigned once more in Bavaria as part of Traun's Army. In 1746, the entire regiment distinguished itself in the Battle of Piacenza in Italy.

During the Seven Years' War, the regiment inhaber was:

  • 1753: Carl Baron Karger von Stampach

During the Seven Years' War, the regiment was commanded by:

  • 1756: Joseph Prince Lobkowitz
  • 1758: Johann Count Waldstein

In 1769, the regiment was numbered 10th. In 1798, it was renumbered as Cuirassier Regiment No. 5. Its last proprietor was, since 1781, FML Caspar Wolfgang Baron Zezschwitz. The regiment was disbanded 1802 and its squadrons transferred to various others cuirassier and dragoon regiments.

Service during the War

In June 1756, at the beginning of the Seven Years' War, the regiment was stationed in Hungary and counted 780 men and 798 horses. On October 1, it took part in the Battle of Lobositz where it was in the second line of the cavalry of the right wing under the command of Major-General Lobkowitz. However, these cavalry units were redeployed in the centre of the Austrian positions. During the battle, Prince Lobkowitz distinguished himself.

On May 6 1757, the regiment took part in the Battle of Prague where it was deployed in Count Lanthiery's Brigade, in the second line of the right wing under Baron Bretlach. On December 5 at the Battle of Leuthen, the regiment was deployed in Woellwurth's Brigade in the first line of the cavalry right wing under General Lucchesi.

By August 2 1758, the regiment was serving in the second line of the main Austrian army under the command of Daun near Jaromirs. Daun was following up the Prussian army retiring through Bohemia after the failure of the invasion of Moravia. On October 14, the regiment took part in the Battle of Hochkirch where it was deployed in Buccow's cavalry column at the extreme right, to the east of Kotitz.

By mid August 1759, the regiment was part of Daun's Corps posted in Silesia. On September 2, it took part in the Combat of Sorau. On November 20, the regiment took part in the Battle of Maxen where four of its squadrons were deployed in the second cavalry column of Sincère's Corps under the command of Lieutenant-General Count Stampa while another squadron was attached to Major-General Baron Seckendorf's detachment occupying the Heights of Malter near Dippoldiswalde.

On November 3 1760, the entire regiment distinguished itself in the Battle of Torgau. Captain Ignaz Baron Kautsch was sent with his horse carabinier company and one company from the Portugal Cuirassiers to secure the flank of the grenadiers who were being attacked by a Prussian cuirassier regiment. Kautsch and his carabiniers drove the Prussians back and captured 3 standards. Later on, Kautsch attacked a Prussian infantry battalion, threw it into disorder and freed many soldiers from Colloredo Infantry (?Jung or Alt Colloredo?) captured by the Prussians (for his valour, Captain Kautsch would receive the Knight Cross of the Maria-Theresia-Order on December 22 1761).

In 1761, the regiment was in Saxony but saw no action.

In 1762, the regiment campaigned once more in Saxony. Only two squadrons, led by Captain Christian Count Rindsmaul, participated in the surprise attack on Meissen.

At the end of the war, in 1763, the regiment marched to its peace-quarters in Transylvania.

Uniform

Privates

Uniform in 1762 – Source: Richard Couture and Ibrahim90
Uniform Details
as per the Albertina Handschrift of 1762

completed with other sources when necessary
Headgear
Trooper black tricorne (no lace) with a black cockade fastened with a brass button
Carabinier black tricorne (no lace) with a black cockade fastened with a brass button
Neckstock black
Coat white lined red with 11 brass buttons on each side
Collar none
Shoulder straps red fastened with a brass button
Lapels none
Pockets horizontal pockets with 3 brass buttons
Cuffs red with 3 brass buttons
Turnbacks red
Waistcoat red with two rows of brass buttons, horizontal pockets with brass buttons
Breeches straw
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt white
Waistbelt none
Cartridge Box n/a
Scabbard black leather with gilt decoration
Footgear black boots
Horse Furniture
Saddlecloth red laced with a wide white braid bordered by a thin red braid and divided into squares by thin red braids (according to an illustration of the Bautzener Bilderhandschrift of 1762)
Housings red laced with a wide white braid bordered by a thin red braid and divided into squares by thin red braids (according to an illustration of the Bautzener Bilderhandschrift of 1762)
Blanket roll white and red (according to an illustration of the Bautzener Bilderhandschrift of 1762)


Troopers were armed with a black breastplate (worn over the coat), a pallasch (sword) and a pair of pistols. Carabiniers also carried a carbine and had a sabre instead of a sword.

Other interpretations

The Bautzener Bilderhandschrift of 1762 shows a gold lace on the tricorne and a red neckstock.

Raspe shows 13 brass buttons (instead of 11) on each side of the coat, and red breeches.

Officers

The officers (according to the Bautzener Bilderhandschrift of 1762) wore the same uniform with the following exceptions:

  • tricorne laced gold with a green and white cockade
  • blue saddlecloth and sabretache both laced in red and fringed in yellow

Musicians

The apron of the trumpet was red with silver embroideries. The apron of the kettle-drum was red with silver decorations.

Colours

From 1745 to 1765, the standards of the cuirassiers were square shaped and made of brocade or damask. Each side of the standard was made from a separate piece. The painted flagpoles were tournament lances.

Leib Standard: not known

Regimental Standard (when it was named Bentheim): red silk with silver embroideries, brown flagpole, golden spearhead, red and gold tassels and cords.

  • Obverse (to the right of the flagpole): an eagle seizing a half-moon and a scroll bearing the motto "Comminuam aut exlinquam"
  • Reverse (to the left of the flagpole): a black double eagle

References

Bleckwenn, Hans; Die Regimenter der Kaiserin, Gedanken zur "Albertina Handschrift" 1762 des Heeresgeschichtlichen Museums Wien, Köln: 1967

Dihm, Dr. Hermann; Oesterreichische Standarten und Fahnen zur Zeit des 7 jährigen Krieges, Die Zinnfigur, Clio

Funcken, Liliane and Fred , Les uniformes de la guerre en dentelle

Gräffer, August: Geschichte der kaiserl. Königl. Regimenter, Corps, Bataillons und anderer Militär-Branchen seit ihrer Errichtung biz zu Ende des Feldzuges 1799, Vol. 2, Vienna, 1804, pp. 23-27

Grosser Generalstab, Die Kriege Friedrichs des Grossen, Hiller, Berlin, 1830-1913

Klimek, St.; Oesterreichische Kavalleriestandarten aus dem 18. Jahrhundert im Heeresmuseum zu Wien, Die Zinnfigur, Clio: 1927

Kornauth, Friedrich, Das Heer Maria Theresias: Faksimile-Ausgabe der Albertina-Handschrift, "Dessins des Uniformes des Troupes I.I. et R.R. de l'année 1762", Wien: 1973

Schirmer, Friedrich, Die Heere der kriegführenden Staaten 1756 - 1763. Edited and published by KLIO-Landesgruppe Baden-Württemberg e.V., Magstadt, 1989.

Thümmler, L.-H., Die Österreichiches Armee im Siebenjährigen Krieg: Die Bautzener Bilderhandschrift aus dem Jahre 1762, Berlin 1993

Wrede , A. von: Geschichte der K. und K. Wehrmacht, file III. first part, Vienna 1898 - 1905

Zahn, Michael, Oesterreichische Kürassier und Dragoner Standarten in Siebenjährigen Krieges, Zusammenstellung, 1988

Acknowledgements

Harald Skala for additionnal information on the origins, history and service of the regiment