Swedish Line Infantry Weapons

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Hierarchical Path: Seven Years War (Main Page) >> Armies >> Swedish Army >> Swedish Line Infantry Weapons

Firearms

After the Great Northern War (1700-1721) and the Russo-Swedish War (1741-1743), the Swedish Economy was in bad shape. Financial and resources problems influenced the types of muskets and rifles used by Swedish Line Infantry during Seven Year War. Although some model of muskets were introduced during the 1730-1750, some Swedish units still had to use old weapons from the arsenal, some of them dating back to Great Northern War.

Swedish Musket M1731

As mentioned above, older models of musket were also in use during the Seven Years' War, such as this M1731 musket.

Technical details
Overall length 1490 mm
Length of barrel 1185 mm
Calibre 20,04 mm
Ball weight 39,9 g
Length of the flintlock plate not available
Weight approx. 4860 grammes
Swedish Musket M1731 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Detail of the flintlock of the Swedish Musket M1731 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Swedish Musket M1738

As mentioned above, older models of musket were also in use during the Seven Years' War, such as this M1738 musket.

Technical details
Overall length not available
Length of barrel 1089 mm
Calibre 20,04 mm
Ball weight 39,9 g
Length of the flintlock plate not available
Weight approx. 4900 grammes
Swedish Musket M1738 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Swedish Musket M1747

This model of musket constituted the main firearm used by the Swedish infantry during the Seven Years' War.

Technical details
Overall length approx. 1500 mm
Length of barrel 1100 mm
Calibre 20,04 mm
Ball weight 39,9 g
Length of the flintlock plate not available
Weight approx. 4800 grammes
Swedish Musket M1747 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum
Swedish Musket M1747 with bayonet - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Detail of the flintlock of the Swedish Musket M1747 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Swedish muskets of that period were typical because they used a flintlock quite different from those used by other armies taking part in Seven Years' War. The sling used to carry the musket was white. Bayonet, ramrod and flintlock were made of iron, other pieces of copper. The very long bayonet was another characteristic of Swedish firearms of this period.

Swedish Pistol M1731

Technical details
Overall length 543 mm
Length of barrel 350 mm
Calibre approx.15.7 mm
Length of the flintlock plate not available
Weight approx. 1380 grams
Swedish Officer's Pistol M1731 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Swedish Pistol M1738

Technical details
Overall length not available
Length of barrel 348 mm
Calibre approx.16 mm
Length of the flintlock plate not available
Weight approx. 1330 grams
Swedish Officer's Pistol M1738 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Edged Weapons

Bayonets

The Swedish bayonets of this period were particularly long (71 cm). The socket of the bayonet was strengthened by a small ring.

The M1731 bayonet was the last Swedish bayonet of the type designed in 1700. It had an overall length of 700 mm. The length of its socket was 81 mm.

Swedish Bayonet M1731 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


The M1738 bayonet was a marked evolution over the M1731. It weighed 650 g and had an overall length of 711 mm. The length of its socket was 101 mm and its blade had a width of 28 mm.

Swedish Bayonet M1738 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


The M1747 bayonet was fixed to the musket the same way than for the Prussian M1740. The shape of the blade was also very similar. The main difference resided in the locking system fastening the bayonet to the muzzle of the musket.

Swedish Bayonet M1747 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Swedish Bayonet Scabbard M1747 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Swedish Infantry Sabre M1748

Technical details
Overall length 730 to 790 mm
Length of the blade 577 to 640 mm
Width of the blade 32 to 36 mm
Height of the curve 15 to 30 mm
Weight 690 to 880 g
Swedish Infantry Sabre M1748 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


This type of sabre was used by Swedish Infantry till 1856. There were a lot of variations for this sabre. Some blade points were oval or sharp. Weight and length varied accordingly. This type of sabre looks very similar to the Prussian M1715, the main difference being the way to fasten the sling.

Technical details
Overall length 605-668 mm
Weight 180 to 270 g
Swedish Sabre Scabbard M1748 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


As for the sabre, there were various designs for the scabbard. Once mote, they are pretty similar to their Prussian counterparts with the copper hook and copper tip.

Swedish Infantry NCOs' Partizan

Technical details
Overall length 2020 to 2200 mm
Length of the blade not available
Width of the blade not available
Weight 1570 to 1860 g
Swedish Infantry NCOs Partizan - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


This type of partizan was used by Swedish Infantry NCOs from 1700 to 1791. Its blade, including its socket was made of iron.

Swedish Infantry Officer's Spontoon

Technical details
Overall length 2020 to 2135 mm
Length of the blade 90 mm
Width of the blade 67 mm
Length of the socket 372 mm
Weight 1070 to 1180 g
Swedish Infantry Officer's Spontoon - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


The heart shaped blade of this spontoon is made of iron, the ferrule is made of copper. However, the blade of the spontoon could be of various shapes.

Swedish Infantry Spontoon Blade - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Swedish Infantry Officers' Sword

Technical details
Overall length from 920 mm to 1000 mm
Length of the blade from 745 mm to 845 mm
Width of the blade from 18 mm to 29 mm
Weight from 450 g to 880 g

Besides a spontoon, officers also carried a sword. Generally, there were no standardized type of sword. Each specimen could be of a different design, weight or length. Bellow we present a few specimens.

Swedish Infantry Officers' Sword 1760-1790 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Swedish Infantry Officers' Sword - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Swedish Infantry Officers' Sword 1750-1800 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


Swedish Infantry Officers' Sword 1750-1800 - Source: DigitalMuseum and the Swedish Army Museum


References

Acknowledgments

Our deep thanks to the Swedish Army Museum for making most photos of its incredible collection available in the public domain

Tomasz Karpiński for the initial version of this article