Trans-Kama Landmilitia Organisation

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Introduction

Landmilitia were established to organize the former service people – outranked noblemen, streltsy etc. – who were not incorporated into the new military system, created by Peter the Great, but were still useful because of their military skills. They were settled as landmilitia garrisons on the frontier defence lines. The Trans-Kama defence line extended between the Samara and Kama rivers, covering the Governorate of Kazan from Bashkirs and Kalmyks raids. When the new Orenburg defence line was established along the Ural River, all Trans-Kama Landmilitia regiments were gradually transferred there between 1738 and 1747.

The Russian Trans-Kama Landmilitia dragoon regiments counted 10 companies, the only infantry regiment counted 8 companies. Maslovskiy gives the following staffs for Trans-Kama landmilitia regiments:

  • a Trans-Kama Landmilitia horse regiment consisted of:
    • 36 officers
    • 990 NCOs and soldiers
    • 33 non-combatants
  • a Trans-Kama Landmilitia infantry regiment consisted of:
    • 30 officers
    • 1,224 NCOs and soldiers
    • 27 non-combatants

This almost exactly meets the 1734 staff establishment for Landmilitia regiments [1].

Officers of the Trans-Kama Landmilitia received money for maintenance of a batman but no batmen were included into the regimental staff.

Viskovatov illustrates the uniform of landmilitia grenadiers. There is no mention about the number of grenadiers in landmilitia regiments, but, considering the total number of soldiers equal to that of infantry and dragoon regiments of the 1731 establishment, we can suppose that each landmilitia dragoon company had 10 horse grenadiers and each landmilitia infantry company had 16 grenadiers.

Composition and Organisation

Trans-Kama Landmilitia Dragoon Regiment

A Trans-Kama Landmilitia dragoon regiment [1] consisted of:

Senior Staff:

  • 1 colonel
  • 1 lieutenant-colonel
  • 1 premier-major

Junior Staff (4 officers, 3 NCOs and 4 non-combatants) including

  • 1 quartermaster (lieutenant)
  • 1 adjutant (lieutenant)
  • 1 auditor (ensign)
  • 1 commissar (lieutenant)
  • 3 sergeants
  • 1 regimental clerk
  • 2 clerics
  • 1 surgeon

10 landmilitia companies (3 officers, 7 NCOs, 92 soldiers, 2 musicians and 1 non-combatant), each of:

  • 1 captain
  • 1 lieutenant
  • 1 ensign
  • 1 wachtmeister
  • 1 captain of arms (kaptenarmus)
  • 1 sub-ensign (color bearer)
  • 4 corporals
  • 10 horse grenadiers
  • 82 dragoons
  • 2 drummers
  • 1 non-combatant
    • 1 clerk

For a total of 1,064 men in a regiment: 37 officers, 73 NCOs, 920 soldiers, 34 non-combatants.

Trans-Kama Landmilitia Infantry Regiment

A Trans-Kama Landmilitia infantry regiment [1] consisted of:

Senior Staff:

  • 1 colonel
  • 1 lieutenant-colonel
  • 1 premier-major

Junior Staff (4 officers and 4 non-combatants) including

  • 1 quartermaster (lieutenant)
  • 1 adjutant (lieutenant)
  • 1 auditor (ensign)
  • 1 commissar (lieutenant)
  • 1 regimental clerk
  • 2 clerics
  • 1 surgeon

8 landmilitia companies (3 officers, 8 NCOs, 144 soldiers, 2 musicians and 1 non-combatant), each of:

  • 1 captain
  • 1 lieutenant
  • 1 ensign
  • 1 captain of arms (kaptenarmus)
  • 1 sub-ensign (color bearer)
  • 6 corporals
  • 16 grenadiers
  • 128 musketeers
  • 2 drummers
  • 1 non-combatant
    • 1 clerk

For a total of 1,275 men in a regiment: 31 officers, 64 NCOs, 1,152 soldiers, 28 non-combatants.

References

[1] Complete collection of laws of the Russian Empire, vol.43, Part 1, pp. 218-219

[2] Viskovatov, A. V., Historical Description of the Clothing and Arms of the Russian Army, vol. 2 and 3, Petersburg: 1900

[3] Maslovskiy, Dmitrij Fedorovich: Russkaia armija w siemieletnjuju wojnu

[4] Kuznecov, B. A.: The new Trans-Kama line and the formation of the land militia, 2009 / Novaja Zakamskaia Linija i Obrazovanie Landmilicii

Acknowledgements

Roman Shlygin for the initial version of this article