Truchseß Dragoons

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Hierarchical Path: Seven Years War (Main Page) >> Armies >> Prussian Army >> Truchseß Dragoons

Origin and History

The regiment (8 companies organised in 4 squadrons) was created on December 30 1704 by the baron von Derfflinger with troops contributed by the existing dragoon regiments and with some recruits.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the regiment was initially stationed in East Prussia from 1705 to 1708. At the end of 1712, it was stationed in Geldern and later in Ravensberg.

In 1714, the regiment was renamed "Grenadiers zu Pferde".

On April 21 1741, the regiment was divided, giving birth to the Dragoner-Regiment Number 4. In September the grenadier mitre caps were abandoned in favour of the tricornes.

During the Seven Years' War, the regiment was under the command of:

  • since April 13 1753: Friedrich Ludwig Truchseß count zu Waldburg
  • from March 19 1757: Peter von Meinicke
  • from April 9 1761 to April 8 1763: Kurt Friedrich von Flanß

Service during the War

On August 26 1756, when the Prussian army proceeded to the invasion of Saxony, the regiment was part of the left column led by the prince of Bevern. This column had concentrated in the area of Lübben, then advanced through Lusatia by Hoyerswerda and Bautzen, to Hohenstein (Sept. 8) then to Lohmen north of the Elbe near Pirna. On October 1, the regiment took part to the battle of Lobositz under lieutenant-general Schwerin. It took part to the second charge north of the Homolka Berg. During this battle, it lost 50 men. In the days after the battle, the regiment was assigned to the protection of the defiles near Welmina.

On May 6 1757, the regiment took part to the battle of Prague where it was deployed in the second line of the right wing under von Meinicke. On June 18, the regiment took part to the battle of Kolin. It was deployed in the first line of the cavalry right wing under prince von Schönaich and covered the retreat of the divisions of Tresckow and Manstein. At the end of August, the regiment was part of the small Prussian army hastily assembled at Dresden by Frederick to head towards Thuringia and to offer battle to the Franco-Imperial army invading Saxony. On September 14, when Frederick was forced to divide his army to contain the French in the region of Magdeburg and to secure the Prussian magazines in the area of Torgau, the regiment remained with Frederick at Erfurt to observe the Franco-Imperial army. On September 15, the regiment was part of Seydlitz's force which occupied Gotha. On September 19, they were temporarily chased from the town by a Franco-Imperial force but Seydlitz managed to recapture Gotha and to occupy it until September 22. On November 5, at the battle of Rossbach, the regiment was deployed in the first line of the right wing under major-general von Seydlitz. It fought and defeated the Austrian Bretlach Cuirassiers and Trautmansdorf Cuirassiers.

On August 12 1759, the regiment took part to the battle of Kunersdorf, losing 11 officers and 148 men.

To do: more details on the campaigns from 1758 to 1762

Uniform

Privates

Uniform in 1757 - Source: Frédéric Aubert
Uniform in 1756
Headgear black tricorne (no lace) with a black cockade fastened with a small white button and pink pompons

N.B.: for combat, the tricorne was reinforced with an iron cap

Neckstock black
Coat cobalt blue with 2 white buttons under the lapel and 3 white buttons on each side to fasten the skirts forming the turnbacks
Collar pink
Shoulder strap left shoulder: blue fastened with a white button
right shoulder: white with a white aiguillette
Lapels pink with 6 white buttons grouped 2 by 2
Pockets horizontal pockets each with 2 white buttons
Cuffs pink (Swedish style) with 2 white buttons
Turnbacks pink
Waistcoat lemon yellow with one row of small white buttons and horizontal pockets, each with white buttons
Breeches buff
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt white
Waistbelt white
Cartridge Box black leather
Scabbard brown leather
Bayonet scabbard brown leather
Footgear black boots
Horse Furniture
Saddlecloth pink with rounded corners; bordered with 3 white braids
Housings pink pointed housings; bordered with 3 white braids
Blanket roll cobalt blue


Troopers were armed with a sword, a pair of pistols, a musket and a bayonet.

Officers

Truchseß Dragoons Officer Lace - Source: Kling, C., Geschichte der Bekleidung, Bewaffnung und Ausrüstung des Königlich Preussischen Heeres

The officers wore the same uniform with the following exceptions:

  • black tricorne (no lace) with a black cockade (attached with a golden fastener) and black and silver pompons
  • golden buttonholes on the coat


Musicians

Truchseß Dragoons Drummer Lace - Source: Kling, C., Geschichte der Bekleidung, Bewaffnung und Ausrüstung des Königlich Preussischen Heeres

Drummers of the regiments of dragoons probably wore the same uniform as the troopers but decorated on the seams with a white lace decorated with 2 pink lateral bands and pink central rhombuses.

Colours

Standards were made of damask. They were swallow-tailed and measured some 50 cm along the pole, 65 cm from the pole to the extremity of a point and 50 cm from the pole to the centre of the indentation. The cords and knots were of silver threads. The pole of the standard was a white tournament lance reinforced with iron hinges. The golden spearhead wore the crowned monogram of Frédéric Wilhelm (FWR).

It is not known how the Leibstandarte was distinguished from the Eskadronstandarten, as descriptions say that all the flags were "white" or "white with a blue/silver centre". However, the fact that the Leibstandarte sent to the newly formed DR 4 was replaced with another Leibstandarte suggests that they were different.

It was traditional on Leibstandarten for the scroll to be white and the centre coloured while Eskadronstandarten had coloured scroll and a white/silver centre. However, with "all white" standards, the Leibstandarte scroll would be coloured and the centre white, while the Eskadronstandarten had white scrolls with coloured centres. We have used the convention of a white scroll to distinguish the Leibstandarte. This regiment received a new Leibstandarte after the regiment was split in 1741, as the regiment's original Leibstandarte was sent to the new DR Nr 4.

The Leibstandarte was of the “FR” design. However, the regiment lost three Eskadronstandarten in the War of the Austrian Succession (one in 1741, two in 1742) and thus carried a mixed set of FR and FWR Eskadronstandarten during the Seven Years War.

Colonel Standard “FR” design (Leibstandarte): white field fringed gold with a silver central medallion surrounded by a golden laurel wreath and decorated with a black eagle holding a sword and lightning bolts surmounted by a white scroll laced gold bearing the golden motto "Pro Gloria et Patria". Decoration in gold in each corner (crowns, laurel wreaths and “FR” ciphers). Squadron Standards “FR” design (Eskadronstandarte): white field fringed gold with a silver central medallion surrounded by a golden laurel wreath and decorated with a black eagle holding a sword and lightning bolts surmounted by a silver scroll laced gold bearing the golden motto "Pro Gloria et Patria". Decoration in gold in each corner (crowns, laurel wreaths and “FR” ciphers).
Colonel Standard – Source: Dal Gavan
Squadron Standard – Source: Dal Gavan
  Squadron Standards “FWR” design (Eskadronstandarte): white field fringed gold with a blue central medallion surrounded by a golden laurel wreath and decorated with a black eagle flying towards a golden sun surmounted by a white scroll laced gold bearing the golden motto "Non Soli Cedit". Decoration in gold in each corner (crowns, laurel wreaths and “FWR” ciphers).
 
Squadron Standard – Source: Dal Gavan

References

Funcken, Liliane and Fred , Les uniformes de la guerre en dentelle

Nelke, R., Preussen

Thümmler, L.-H., Preußische Militärgeschichte

Vial J. L., Nec Pluribus Impar

N.B.: the section Service during the War is mostly derived from our articles depicting the various campaigns, battles and sieges.