Zandre Infantry

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Hierarchical Path: Seven Years War (Main Page) >> Armies >> Hanoverian Army >> Zandre Infantry

Origin and History

In 1671, a regiment of two battalions (10 companies) was established. It took part in the siege of Braunschweig.

In 1673, during the Franco-Dutch War (1672–78), the regiment campaigned against Turenne's French Army. In 1674, it took part in the Battle of Entzheim and in the storming of Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines; in 1675, in the siege and capture of Trier; in 1676, in the blockade and capture of Stade where its second battalion was left. The first battalion then went to the blockade of Zweybrück. In 1677, the second battalion took part in the siege of Stettin. In 1678, the second battalion was at the siege of Stralsund while the first battalion fought in the combat of Saint-Denis.

In 1679, the regiment returned home but was soon sent to encamp to the west of Hamburg which was blockaded by the Danes.

In 1683, two companies were added to this regiment.

In 1685, during the Great Turkish War, eight of the twelve companies of the regiment were sent to Hungary where they took part in the siege of Neuhäusl (present-day Nové Zámky) before returning home.

In 1686, the regiment marched against the Danes to protect Hamburg, making itself master of Moorburg and Bergedorf.

In 1688, at the outbreak of the Nine Years' War (1688–97), the first battalion of the regiment was sent to the Rhine. In 1689, it took part in the Battle of Walcourt and in the capture of Mainz and Bonn; in 1690, in the Battle of Fleurus; in 1692, in the Battle of Steenkerque. In 1692, the regiment ceded two companies to another regiment. The same year, its second battalion was sent to Hungary. In 1694, the first battalion took part in the siege and capture of Namur.

In 1700, the regiment was sent against the Danes in Holstein.

In 1701, at the outbreak of the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-13), the first battalion was sent to the Netherlands In 1702, it took part in the sieges and capture of Kayserwerth and Venlo. In 1704, the second battalion had to replace De Carles Infantry, which had been decimated at Speyerbach, in the Dutch service. It joined the Allied army in Bavaria. Then the two battalions of the regiment took part in the Battle of the Schellenberg and in the famous Battle of Blenheim. In 1705, the regiment was incorporated into the Hanoverian Army. During that campaign, it took part in the forcing of the Lines near Heilesheim. In 1706, it fought in the Battle of Ramillies. Then its second battalion took part in the siege of Menen. In 1708, the first battalion took part in the Battle of Oudenarde then both battalions participated in the siege of the Citadel of Lille. In r 1709, the regiment took part in the Battle of Malplaquet. Its second battalion then participated in the siege of Tournay. The two battalions were later at the siege of Mons. In 1711, the first battalion took part in the siege of Bouchain. In 1712, the second battalion was at the capture of Le Quesnoy. In 1714, when most of the Hanoverian army returned home, the regiment remained on the Rhine with the Reichsarmee. It later returned to Hanover.

In 1719, the first battalion of the regiment took part in the incursion in Mecklenburg and in the action of Wallsmühlen against the Russians and the Mecklenburgers.

In 1724, the regiment was subdivided in two distinct regiments. The first battalion forming Sebo Infantry (the object of the present article) and the second, Ranzow Infantry.

In 1733, the regiment was sent to Mecklenburg to quench troubles. The sane year, at the outbreak of the War of the Polish Succession (1733-35), it formed part of the Hanoverian contingent of 6 battalions who joined the Imperial army. In 1734, it joined this army on the Rhine. In 1735, it took part in the action near Kloster Clausen on the Schwalmbach. In 1736, it returned to Hanover.

In 1742, during the War of the Austrian Succession (1740-48), the regiment joined an Imperial army in the Netherlands. In 1743, it campaigned on the Main and took part in the Battle of Dettingen. In 1744, as part of General Wade's Army, it advanced up to Lille but soon returned to the Netherlands. In 1745, it was sent to the Rhine. In 1746, it returned to Hanover. In 1747, it campaigned on the Lower Rhine. In 1748, it fought in the combat of Rosenthal near Berg-op-Zoom.

The successive regimental inhabers were:

  • from 1724: Colonel Johan Just Sebo
  • from 1729: Colonel Johann de Soubiron
  • from 1754: Colonel Carl Friedrich von Zandre de Caraffa (retired in 1757 as major-general)
  • from 1757: Colonel Hans Jürgen von Halberstadt (promoted to major-general in 1759, retired in 1761)
  • from 1761: Colonel Christoph Carl von Linsingen (promoted to major-general in 1775)

Service during the War

On July 26 1757, during the French invasion of Hanover, the regiment took part in the Battle of Hastenbeck where it was deployed in the detachment posted between Afferde and Diedersen. This detachment executed an outflanking movement against the French offensive at Hastenbeck and caused near panic among the French towards the conclusion of the battle. During the retreat, it formed part of the rearguard.

On May 26 1758, the regiment was part of Wangenheim's Corps encamped at Dorsten. On May 31, this corps accompanied Ferdinand of Brunswick in his offensive on the west bank of the Rhine. On June 18, Wangenheim's Corps passed the Rhine at Duisburg. On June 23, the regiment took part in the Battle of Krefeld where it was deployed on the right wing in the brigade placed under the command of the Erbprinz (Hereditary Prince) of Brunswick.

In June 1759, the regiment was once more part of Wangenheim's Corps who had taken position at Dülmen in Westphalia to observe the movement of a French corps under the Marquis d'Armentières. On August 1, the regiment took part in the Battle of Minden where it was deployed in Wangenheim's Corps between Kutenhausen and the Weser, in the first line of the infantry centre. The regiment helped assault the village of Totenhausen on the right flank. It later took part in the siege of Münster.

In 1760, the regiment took part in the affair of Dillenburg where Lieutenant von Weyhe was killed. The regiment then took up its winter-quarters in Erwitte. On September 19, as part of Wangenheim's Corps, it took part in the combat of Löwenhagen against superior French force. It was detached before the engagement to protect communication with Uslar. It was then allocated to Lückner's Corps and took position at Northeim and Moringen to keep the garrison of Göttingen at bay. At the beginning of winter, it marched towards the Eichsfeld region and drove the enemy out of Duderstadt and Gieboldehausen. It then took up its winter-quarters in Duderstadt.

On January 2 1761, the regiment was forced to evacuate Duderstadt but it took position on neighbouring heights. On February 15, it took part in the Combat of Langensalza where it was deployed in General von Spörcken's Corps. On March 21, the regiment fought in the engagement of Grünberg. On July 16, it took part in the Battle of Vellinghausen where it was attached to the Reserve.

By May 23 1762, the regiment served in the Corps of the Hereditary Prince of Brunswick operating in Westphalia. In July, it took part in the attack across the Fulda. On August 30, it fought in the combat of Nauheim where it was deployed in Lieutenant-general von Hardenberg's Column. In this action, Lieutenant-Colonel de la Porte, Major von Puffendorf and Captain von Melzing were wounded. On September 21, the regiment fought in the combat of Amöneburg where it was deployed in Zastrow's Corps occupying the ground immediately before the Brücker Mühle (Zastrow commanded in the absence of Lieutenant-general Hardenberg).

In 1763, after the signature of peace, the regiment garrisoned Hameln where it would remain until 1768.

Uniform

Privates

Uniform in 1759 - Source: Hannoverdidi
Uniform Details
Headgear
Musketeer black tricorne laced white with a sprig of oak leaves, three yellow/red pom poms and a black cockade
Grenadier
Zandre Infantry Grenadier Mitre Cap - Source: Hannoverdidi
Prussian mitre in the British pattern with a small front flap. Yellow front with white scrollwork crowned red field with springing horse and Order of the Garter. Small red flap with white grenade. Red sack, yellow base lined with white lace.
Neck stock black
Coat red with 2 pewter buttons and 2 white buttonholes under the lapels
Collar none
Shoulder Straps red (left shoulder)
Lapels gold yellow, each with 7 pewter buttons and 7 white buttonholes
Pockets horizontal pockets, each with 2 pewter buttons and 2 white buttonholes
Cuffs gold yellow (slashed in the British pattern), each with 3 pewter buttons and 2 white buttonholes just above each cuff on the sleeves
Turnbacks straw fastened with a pewter button
Waistcoat straw with 2 horizontal pockets, each with 3 pewter buttons
Breeches straw yellow
Gaiters white
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt natural leather
Waistbelt natural leather
Cartridge Box black
Bayonet Scabbard black
Scabbard black
Footgear black


N.B.: some sources indicate buff as the distinctive colour.

Troopers were armed with a musket and a sword (brass hilt), and carried a dark brown haversack with a metal canteen on the left hip.

Officers

Officers had silver lace lining the cuffs and lapels, a black cockade hat, a gold gorget with the arms of Hanover in the centre and carried a yellow sash slung over the right shoulder. Sergeants wore straw gloves. Partizans were carried.

Musicians

Drummers wore a red coat with swallows nest and lace in white.

The drum pattern had hoops in alternating gold yellow and red diagonal stripes, white drum cords over a brass drum with the Arms of Hanover in the centre.

Colours

Colonel Flag: White field bearing the arms of Hanover (common to all Hanoverian infantry regiments except 10-B).

Colonel Colour - Source: Hannoverdidi

Regimental Flag: Dark yellow field. Mars seated on a trophy of arms above flies the spirit, Fame, above which is a scroll with the inscription NULLI SINE MARTE TRIUMPHI. Hereafter, we present an illustration from the Reitzenstein Sammlung, dating from circa 1761 (left) and the interpretation of Hannoverdidi (right).

Regimental Colour - Source: Interpretation of the Reitzenstein Sammlung (circa 1761)
Regimental Colour - Source: Interpretation of user Hannoverdidi

References

This article incorporates texts from the following books which are now in the public domain:

Other sources

Biles, Bill: The Hanoverian Army in the 18th Century, Seven Years War Association Journal Vol. VI No. 3

Gmundener Prachtwerk, circa 1761

Knötel, H. d. J. and Hans M. Brauer: Uniformbogen Nr. 45, Berlin

Pengel & Hurt: German States in the Seven Years War 1740 to 1762, Imperial Press

Reitzenstein Sammlung, Bomann Museum, Celle

Rogge, Christian: The French & Allied Armies in Germany during the Seven Years War, Frankfurt, 2006