Peribolos of the 12 Gods

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Description

Reconstruction of the Peribolos of the 12 Gods by Kronoskaf - Textured 3D Model
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Reconstruction of the Peribolos of the 12 Gods by Kronoskaf - Textured 3D Model
Plan of the Peribolos of the 12 Gods (top view)
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Plan of the Peribolos of the 12 Gods (top view)

The Peribolos of the 12 Gods was established in the Agora by Peisistratos' grandson (also named Peisistratos) around 522 BC. It was located in front of the Stoa Basileios and of the Stoa of Zeus Eleutherios. The 12 major Gods were: Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, Hades, Aphrodite, Apollo, Ares, Artemis, Athena, Demeter, Hephaistos and Hermes. The altar was considered the central point of Athens and all distances were measured from it.

The Peribolos was badly damaged by the Persians during their occupation of Athens in 480 BC. It was repaired around 425 BC.

A low poros wall enclosed the altar. The wall consisted of poros slabs and posts. There were two entrances located in the middle of the east and west sides. Trees or shrubs were planted within the enclosure, around the altar. There were also a couple of stone water basins.

The north and south sides of the original enclosure measured 9.35 m and the east and west sides 9.86 m. When the enclosure was restaured around 425 BC, it north and south sides were shortened to 9.05 m.

Later Features

The reliefs on each side of the entrance were probably added after our period of reference (421 BC).

References

American School of Classical Studies at Athens; The Athenian Agora: A Guide to the Excavation and Museum, 1990

Camp, John M.; The Archaeology of Athens, Yale University Press, 2001, p. 32

Connolly, Peter and Hazel Dodge; The Ancient City - Life in Classical Athens & Rome, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998

Flacelière, Robert, La vie quotidienne en Grèce au siècle de Périclès, Hachette, 1959

Travlos, John, Pictorial dictionary of Ancient Athens, Books that matter, New York, 1971, p. 458

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